Moore’s Lovecraftian Bibliography

Below are all of Moore’s  stories that make reference to Lovecraft or the Cthulhu Mythos, listed in publication date order. All writing by Alan Moore unless otherwise specified. Select a story to view annotations page. If there’s no link, we haven’t done or found any annotations yet.

Comics

Yuggoth Cultures #1 (2003)
Yuggoth Cultures #1 (2003)

1. Alan Moore’s The Courtyard (2003); comic adaptation by Antony Johnston, art by Jacen Burrows. Two-issue series, collected and re-released in black and white and color versions; also collected in Neonomicon (2010). Very faithful graphic adaptation of Alan Moore’s short story “The Courtyard.” In an alternate present, Aldo Sax is an FBI investigator with a knack for seeing patterns investigates a series of mysterious murders in Red Hook, all of which seem connected to a drug – the white powder. Unfortunately for Sax, he connects the dots and gets a glimpse of truths man was not meant to know. Inspired by H. P. Lovecraft’s Fungi from Yuggoth sonnet IX: The Courtyard.

2. Alan Moore’s Yuggoth Cultures and Other Growths (2003); includes comic adaptations of “Zaman’s Hill” (issue #1) and “Recognition” (issue #2) by Antony Johnston, art by Jacen Burrows, as well as annotated scripts and additional comics illustrated by other artists, and the interview “The Story Behind the Stories” (issue #3). Three-issue series, collected with the three-issue series Yuggoth Creatures (2004) in the trade paperback Alan Moore’s Yuggoth Cultures and Other Growths (2007). “Zaman’s Hill” is a plotless exercise in fantastic geography, touching on Lovecraft’s use of pagan cults, degenerate backwoods folk, and strange underground entities; Moore’s prose-poem was based on Lovecraft’s Fungi from Yuggoth sonnet VII: Zaman’s Hill. “Recognition” is based on the stories of Winfield Scott Lovecraft, H. P. Lovecraft’s father, primarily his syphilis-induced hallucination and theoretical use of prostitutes; Moore’s prose-poem was based on H. P. Lovecraft’s Fungi from Yuggoth sonnet IV: Recognition.

3. Alan Moore’s The Courtyard Companion (2004); script by Antony Johnston, annotations by NG Christakos, art by Jacen Burrows. Contains Alan Moore’s original story “The Courtyard,” Johnston’s comic script based on the story, and Christakos’ annotations, noting the Cthulhu Mythos and Lovecraftian references in script and story.

4. League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: The Black Dossier (2007); art by Kevin O’Neill. A sequel to the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, where Allan Quarterman, Mina Murray, and Orlando return to Britain in 1958 to recover the eponymous Black Dossier, a collection of their travels and a secret history of the British Isles, written and illustrated in a variety of styles to represent the changes in popular literature. References to the Cthulhu Mythos are included in “On the Descent of Gods,” Moore’s illustrated crossover with Jeeves and Wooster “What Ho, Gods of the Abyss,” the Kerouc-style “The Crazy Wide Forever,” and the final portion in 3D, where Nyarlathotep makes a brief appearance as an ambassador from Yuggoth to the Blazing World.

5. Neonomicon (2010-2011); art by Jacen Burrows. Four-issue comic series, plus hornbook, later collected with the two-issue run of Alan Moore’s The Courtyard as the Neonomicon (2011) in hardback and trade paperback. Following the events of Courtyard, Aldo Sax has been committed to a secure psychiatric institution, but the FBI continues to follow the case, this time with agents Gordon Lamper and Merril Brears. The two uncover a cult connected with Lovecraft’s writings, Lamper is killed and Brears is brutally raped, both by the cultists and a non-human creature. Like with Aldo Sax, the ordeal brings about a personal epiphany in Brears. (See Neonomicon annotations beginning issue #1 here.)

6. Nemo: Heart of Ice (2013); art by Kevin O’Neill. Graphic novel following the continuing exploits of Janni Dakkar, the new Captain Nemo. Following on a cryptic hint in her father’s diary, the Nautilus and her crew explore a fantastic Antarctica, over the the Mountains of Madness to the city of the Elder Things from Lovecraft’s At the Mountains of Madness…chased all the way by those they have stolen from, hot on revenge.

7. Providence (2015); art by Jacen Burrows. Twelve-issue series on Lovecraft, due May 2015. (See Providence annotations beginning issue #1 here.)

Prose

Starry Wisdom (2010)
Starry Wisdom (2010)

1. “The Courtyard”; short fiction. Published in The Starry Wisdom Anthology: A Tribute to H. P. Lovecraft (1994); republished in The Starry Wisdom (2003). In an alternate present, Aldo Sax is an FBI investigator with a knack for seeing patterns investigates a series of mysterious murders in Red Hook, all of which seem connected to a drug – the white powder. Unfortunately for Sax, he connects the dots and gets a glimpse of truths man was not meant to know. Inspired by H. P. Lovecraft’s Fungi from Yuggoth sonnet IX: The Courtyard.

2. “Zaman’s Hill”; prose poem. Published in Dust: A Creation Books Sampler (1995); republished in The Starry Wisdom (2003). Inspired by H. P. Lovecraft’s Fungi from Yuggoth sonnet VII: Zaman’s Hill.

3. “Recognition”; prose poem. Published in Dust: A Creation Books Sampler (1995); republished in The Starry Wisdom (2003). Inspired by H. P. Lovecraft’s Fungi from Yuggoth sonnet IV: Recognition.

4. “The Great Old Ones”; magical writing. Art by John Coulthart. Published in The Haunter of the Dark and Other Grotesque Visions (1999). A Lovecraftian qabbalah, filling the stations of the sephiroth with Lovecraftian entities, superbly illustrated by Coulthart.

5. “Allan Quartermain and the Sundered Veil”; short fiction. Art by Kevin O’Neill. Published serially in the back pages of League of Extraordinary Gentlemen book one, issues 1-6 (1999-2000); reprinted in the various collected editions of that volume. A prequel to the events of book one, told in the form of a Victorian-era penny dreadful, brings together Allan Quartermain, Mina Murray, the Time Traveler, John Carter, and H. P. Lovecraft’s Randolph Carter in dream and reality, through time and space, battle against morlocks and a Lovecraftian horror. With accompanying illustrations by O’Neill.

6. “The New Travellers Almanac”; short fiction. Art by Kevin O’Neill. Published serially in the back pages of League of Extraordinary Gentlemen book two, issues 1-6 (2002-2003); reprinted in the various collected editions of that volume. A pan-fictional crossover of epic proportions, connecting or references dozens of characters, locations, and stories from fiction, predominantly but not exclusively from Victorian era gothic fantasies, early scientifiction, etc., presented in the form of an annotated diary of the League’s travels after the events of book two. Includes reference to Lovecraft’s Arkham and Innsmouth, as well as Captain Obed Marsh and the Deep Ones from The Shadow over Innsmouth. With accompanying illustrations by O’Neill.

Non-Fiction & Interviews

New Annotated Lovecraft (2014)
New Annotated Lovecraft (2014)

1. “Beyond Our Ken”; book review. Published in Midian Mailer #2 (1998); republished in Kaos 14 (2002). Nominally a review of Kenneth Grant’s novel Against the Light: A Nightside Narrative, but is primarily an appreciative but astute examination of Grant himself, and the impact of his magical writings.

2. “The Story Behind the Stories: An Interview with Alan Moore about Yuggoth Cultures and Other Growths” (2004), with William Christensen, in Alan Moore’s Yuggoth Cultures and Other Growths #3. The story behind the stories in in Yuggoth Cultures, including the aborted Yuggoth Cultures novel and the origin behind “Zaman’s Hill” and “Recognition.”

3. “Alan Moore: Unearthed and Uncut” (2010), with Bram E. Gieben. Link. A look at the story behind Neonomicon.

4. “Modernizing Lovecraft: An In-Depth Interview with Alan Moore” (2012), with Ali Tantimedh, in Bleeding Cool Magazine #1-2. A deeper look at Moore’s approach to Lovecraft and Neonomicon.

5. “Interview – Alan Moore on Providence, Jerusalem, League and more – Part 1” (2013), with Pádraig Ó Méalóid. Link. An early discussion on Providence.

6. Introduction to The New Annotated Lovecraft (2014). Excerpt. An astute and insightful look on H. P. Lovecraft as a man who reflected the fears of the people of his day.

7. “All About Alienation: Alan Moore on Lovecraft and Providence” (2014), with Nick Talbot. Link. A look at The Courtyard, Neonomicon, and Providence.

 

 

 

One thought on “Moore’s Lovecraftian Bibliography

  1. There’s been a prior connection made between the creatures from the Black Lagoon, seen in Nemo: River of Ghosts (2015), and the Deep Ones. The endpapers of ROG have a Lovecraftian creature embedded in Antarctic ice.

    Liked by 1 person

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